GET INVOLVED

GET INVOLVED

GET INVOLVED

GET INVOLVED

SEND  ME YOUR EXPERIENCES OF HEALTH PRIORITISATION  DECISIONS

It is important that we learn from the prioritisation decisions that have been made - both good and bad. Please send me those that you have been involved with.

 

The section starts with a blog describing my own experience with cancer and being affected by prioritisation decisions. The first prioritisation decision the doctors made meant that I did not have the latest drugs ( they were kept for patients with failing kidneys) but I did have state of the art radiotherapy when only 30% of the country at that time had access to this equipment. The NHS was prioritising cancer drugs of dubious cost effectiveness over expanding the number of radiotherapy  machines which are proven to be cost effective. They are at last putting more money into radiotherapy machines but nothing compared to the money they are allocating for drugs. Another example was when my latest follow appointment was cancelled as the hospital had too many new patients to see in the winter rush in the NHS so (quite rightly) were prioritising new patients .

 

However while  travelling along my own person (ongoing)  "cancer journey" and subject to prioritisation decisions I have confidence that I am getting high quality care at the same time that resources are  being used wisely so that many more needy patients  have access to high quality care.

My Blog as a patient

Doctors can be patients too - and subject to their own prioritisation decisions 

Check out the Decision Making  Audit Tool (DMAT) that is freely available on this website

PLEASE SEND ME EXAMPLES OF WHEN YOU HAVE BEEN INVOLVED WITH DIFFICULT HEALTH PRIORITISATION DECISIONS 

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ABOUT WEBSITE

This website was developed as part of a Rockefeller Academic Residency  in February 2018 by Peter Littlejohns. It  collates the research endeavors of the Social Values Group that was a joint venture between Kings College London and University College London and the research  programme supported by the Collaboration for Leadership  in Health and Research Care South London funded by the National Institute for Health Research in the UK. It features vistas of the Bellagio Centre to celebrate that man made structures can enhance rather than detract from the natural environment

For more information contact Professor Peter Littlejohns

peter.littlejohns@kcl.ac.uk

Peter is supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care South London (NIHR CLAHRC South London) at King’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust. The views expressed on this website and research articles are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR, or the Department of Health and Social Care. The first workshop was supported by the Wellcome Trust and Nuffield Trust and the second workshop by the Brocher Foundation 

Website designed February 2018 at the Rockefeller Foundation  Bellagio Centre by Peter Littlejohns as his Residency Project